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Myths about the Roman God Aristaeus

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Myths about the Roman God Aristaeus
The content of this 'Myths about the Roman God Aristaeus article provides interesting information about the legends and stories from Roman mythology about this famous Roman God.

Myths about the Roman God Aristaeus
The Aristaeus, son of Apollo, by the nymph Cyrene, daughter of Hypseus, king of the Lapithae, was born in Lybia, and in that part of it where the city Cyrene was built.

He received his education from the nymphs, who taught him to extract oil from olives, and to make honey, cheese, and butter; all which arts he communicated to mankind. Going to Thebes, he there married Autonoe, daughter of Cadmus, and, by her, was father to Actaeon, who was torn in pieces by his own dogs. At length he passed into Thrace, where Bacchus initiated him into the mysteries of the Orgia, and taught him many things conducive to the happiness of life. Having dwelt some time near Mount Hemus, he disappeared, and not only the barbarous people of that country, but the Greeks likewise decreed him divine honors.

It is remarked by Bayle, that Aristaeus found out the solstitial rising of Sirius, or the dog-star; and he adds, it is certain that this star had a particular relation to Aristaeus; for this reason, when the heats of the dog-star laid waste the Cyclades, and occasioned there a pestilence, Aristaeus was entreated to put a stop to it. He went directly into the isle of Cea, and built an altar to Jupiter, offered sacrifices to that deity, as well to the malignant star, and established an anniversary for it. These produced a very good effect, for it was from thence that the Etesian winds had their origin, which continue forty days, and temper the heat of the summer. On his death, for the services he had rendered mankind, he was placed among the stars, and is the Aquarius of the Zodiac.

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